To some, the game of football is supremely important.

To quote the words of Bill Shankly, legendary Liverpool manager –

“Some people believe football is a matter of life and death, I am very
disappointed with that attitude. I can assure you it is much, much more
important than that.”

Football is no longer a game played by opposing teams of eleven players a side. It is huge business and as a huge business is heavily regulated by the governing bodies. so much so that when new Stadia are proposed (in Europe anyway) UEFA loves to get involved.

Did you know that UEFA have a Guide to Quality Stadiums? A whopping 156 pages of guidelines, stats and suggestions as to how the perfect Stadium should be organised – right down to the tiniest detail. Take toilets for example; here’s the governing body’s take on one of  those essentials of life:

One of the most important public facilities in a stadium are the toilets. These are normally located in the main concourses, and are positioned to make access from the seating areas as easy as possible. When determining the number and ratio of toilet facilities, the latest UEFA and local standards should be consulted.

Toilet facilities should be designed to cope with intensive use during short periods of time, as the majority of visits will occur before the start of the match, at half-time and after the final whistle.

Hence, the design should facilitate the easy flow of people in and out of these areas during these peak times.

The ratio of men’s toilets to women’s needs to be established according to specific criteria defined by the club/association and in line with national guidelines. More and more women attend football matches and their needs must be just as well catered for as men’s. There must also be an adequate number of disabled toilets located at each level and equally distributed throughout the perimeter of the stadium. It is recommended that some disabled toilets also incorporate baby-changing facilities.

Guidance regarding the minimum number/ratio of disabled toilets to be included will be available in local regulations and the UEFA-CAFE publication Access for All.

With all the headaches of running a football club, the minutiae of detail required to maintain a washroom in pristine condition is something that isn’t high on the agenda for most football league clubs. this is where the expertise and knowledge of the NWR Hygiene Group can be invaluable, taking away all the headaches of washroom management and providing a facilities management service for Football clubs that is second to none, enabling clubs to focus on their core business of winning games and remaining profitable.

If you really want to drill down into the nitty- gritty of building and running your own Football Stadium, here is the link to download the full report: uefa.to/2qy851u

 

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This